Originally posted on Missional Field Notes:

check from Flickr via Wylio © 2010 Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center, Flickr | CC-BY | via Wylio

Here is a brief, not exhaustive, check list of things to consider:

  • Be sure: Know that this is a God idea not just a good idea.
  • Vision: Seek and clarify a clear vision for the proposed Missional Community. First with the leaders of the group then with the members.
  • Explain: Clearly set out the idea and the vision.
  • Be patient: Not everyone will get it straight away. Don’t rush, take your time.
  • Room for everyone: Allow everyone in the group to contribute to the discussion.
  • Space: Allow space for reflection and prayer. Encourage each member of the group to listen to God and each other.
  • Opportunity to contribute to the vision: Allow everyone in the group to discuss and contribute to the vision. However don’t be sidetracked away from the core vision God has…

View original 48 more words

Pastor Chaney:

Can this approach be used to teach the community how to study as well as reflect? I like it and hope that it bears fruit

Originally posted on Missional Field Notes:

Canonical from Flickr via Wylio 2009 brett jordan, Flickr | CC-BY | via Wylio

I have tried to make a little bit of Bible study a part of our fledgeling communities. I’m very intentionally trying to not turn it into just a Bible study and I’m very intentionally making sure that everyone is able to share a bit about what the passage might mean to them. I want it to shape the lives of the members but also let them know they have the ability to interact with the Bible through the Spirit.

Alex Absalom gives some pointers here:

What we are trying to develop is a way of reading the Bible in missional communities that democratizes the process, so that anyone can do it. This requires a confidence in the power of the Bible, by giving it room to breathe and shape thoughts and behaviors within our group without us first micromanaging the…

View original 99 more words

By Barbara Brown Taylor

That is what Holy Saturday has taught me about being Christian. Between the great dramas of life, there is almost always a time of empty waiting — with nothing to do and no church service to help — a time when it is necessary to come up with your own words and see how they sound with no other sounds to cover them up. If you are willing to rest in this Sabbath, where you cannot see your hand in front of your face and none of your self-protective labors can do you one bit of good, then you may come as close to the Christ as you will ever get — there in that quiet cave where you wait to see how the Maker of All Life will choose to come to you in the dark.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/barbara-brown-taylor/learning-to-wait-in-the-dark_b_5175191.html – to read the entire article

image

By Antipas L. Harris / Religion News Service

http://www.ministrymatters.com/reach/entry/5927/racial-reconciliation-demands-christians-reconsider-the-death-penalty

(RNS) A new report by the Equal Justice Initiative documents in horrific detail the nation’s widespread practice of lynching and points to a link between lynching and a practice that persists today: capital punishment.

In the Jim Crow South, lynching declined as officials turned to executions as an alternative method for killing blacks in disproportionate numbers.

This report challenges us to confront our nation’s legacy of racial violence. Sadly, too many Christians were complicit in this violence, which has prompted Christian denominations to apologize and emphasize racial reconciliation.

image

#nofear #totaltrust #dontlookback

Luke 23:39-43
39 One of the criminals hanging next to Jesus insulted him: “Aren’t you the Christ? Save yourself and us!”40 Responding, the other criminal spoke harshly to him, “Don’t you fear God, seeing that you’ve also been sentenced to die? 41 We are rightly condemned, for we are receiving the appropriate sentence for what we did. But this man has done nothing wrong.” 42 Then he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” 43 Jesus replied, “I assure you that today you will be with me in paradise.”

lfurtado-edit-iStock_sky

The difference between the two men being executed with Jesus was simple yet significantly complex. The difference was humility. To the casual observer it looks like there are three convicted criminals with no redeeming qualities. At first glance it appears that there is no need to acknowledge their individual and unique characteristics. If you were to operate with the initial presentation of facts you would miss the significant moment that Jesus shared on the cross.   (more…)

Determined Discipleship
Mark David Ribbins

The Death of Lazarus

Now a man named Lazarus was sick. He was from Bethany, the village of Mary and her sister Martha. (This Mary, whose brother Lazarus now lay sick, was the same one who poured perfume on the Lord and wiped his feet with her hair.) So the sisters sent word to Jesus, “Lord, the one you love is sick.”When he heard this, Jesus said, “This sickness will not end in death. No, it is for God’s glory so that God’s Son may be glorified through it.” Now Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus. So when he heard that Lazarus was sick, he stayed where he was two more days, and then he said to his disciples, “Let us go back to Judea.”

“But Rabbi,” they said, “a short while ago the Jews there tried to stone you,and yet you are going back?” Jesus answered, “Are there not twelve hours of daylight? Anyone who walks in the daytime will not stumble, for they see by this world’s light. 10 It is when a person walks at night that they stumble, for they have no light.”

11 After he had said this, he went on to tell them, “Our friend Lazarus has fallen asleep; but I am going there to wake him up.” 12 His disciples replied, “Lord, if he sleeps, he will get better.” 13 Jesus had been speaking of his death, but his disciples thought he meant natural sleep.14 So then he told them plainly, “Lazarus is dead, 15 and for your sake I am glad I was not there, so that you may believe. But let us go to him.” 16 Then Thomas (also known as Didymus[a]) said to the rest of the disciples, “Let us also go, that we may die with him.”

 

It’s easy to follow Jesus, as long as He’s popular in the places where you’re following
— a lesson His disciples learned while watching the course of His ministry.

“ Called to be fishers of men? How cool to hang with Jesus!
Watching a temple crowd pick up rocks to stone Him, not so great.
Helping to feed 5000 with a bag lunch? Amazing experience!
Castigated by Pharisees for picking grain on the Sabbath, what a royal pain!”

(more…)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,105 other followers