For immediate release August 1, 2013

Media contact: Donna Dotson 410 409 5378
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REDD APPOINTED AS NEW CAMPUS PASTOR AT INFINITE GRACE FELLOWSHIP

The Isaiah Redd Sr has been appointed as a campus pastor of the Infinite Grace Fellowship by resident Bishop Marcus Matthews of the Baltimore-Washington Conference. Pastor Redd began his pastoral duties at Infinite Grace Fellowship July 1. Infinite Grace is one of  seven new faith communities established this year by Vibrant Congregations and is currently meeting at 5130 Greenwich in Baltimore, on the city’s historic “40 West” corridor.

Isaiah Redd, Sr. is a Baltimore Native in Parkville, Maryland. He is the eldest son of Ms. Lunetta Redd and Mr. Luther Redd, Sr. He is one of 5 children who include, Isaac Redd, Shawn Barber, Alysha Smith and Devon Smith.

Pastor Isaiah was an honor student at Overlea Senior High School where he graduated in 1990. He then enlisted in the United States Army as a Field Artilleryman and served 11 years. Isaiah was stationed in Korea, Oklahoma, and Germany. While serving in the Army, Isaiah was decorated as the Soldier of the Month in May 1995 and Soldier of the Quarter in July 1995. After his release from the Army, Isaiah heard the call of God and decided to finally answer.

In 2002, Isaiah became a Certified Lay Speaker serving at Eastern United Methodist Church and immediately started working with youth ministry. Isaiah’s life and
faith in God were tested when he was hit by a car and was told that he would be loose his left leg, but the grace and power of God was with him and healed his leg.
Since this life changing event, Isaiah recognized the Power of God in his life and realized God had something special to do with him in ministry. Isaiah is currently a certified candidate for ministry pursuing full time ordained ministry.

Isaiah brings with him his lovely and talented wife, Amali S. Redd, and his 3 children, Amaiah, Imani, and Isaiah, Jr. (Rock). Pastor Isaiah looks forward to spreading the word of God to the people of God by any means that are available

 

For immediate release July 15,2013
Media contact: Donna Dodson  (410) 945-8397

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CHANEY APPOINTED AS REVITALIZATION PASTOR, TO START A NEW FAITH COMMUNITY

The Rev. William T. Chaney Jr. has been appointed to the Infinite Grace Parish which is comprised of two congregations by resident Bishop Marcus Matthews of the Baltimore-Washington Conference. . A new church initiative Infinite Grace Fellowship and revitalizing church West Baltimore United Methodist Church.  Rev. William T Chaney Jr began his pastoral duties in the historic 40 West Corridor of Baltimore on July 1.  The initial worship will be located at 5130 Greenwich Avenue in Baltimore.

Rev. Chaney most recently served as the District Superintendent of the Baltimore Metropolitan District. Rev. Chaney, a native of Cincinnati, Ohio, is a natural, dynamic speaker, who has also served churches in Georgia, Ohio and Maryland since 1990, prior to coming to Baltimore. William has a passion for youth which was demonstrated while he served The Youth Theological Initiative at Emory University , the Youth Hope Builders Academy at the Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta, and the Boys & Girls Clubs of Frederick County. He has also been a featured speaker with Monster.com’s “Making it Count” program to provide students with templates for success in high school, college and beyond.

Regarding his appointment with enthusiasm, Pastor Chaney explains, “My main objective is to develop a dynamic, multiethnic congregation that is relevant to this current generation and serves the needs of the people in the West Baltimore community.  I have a vision of both congregations being healthy, vibrant churches that function through team ministry to provide opportunities for people’s lives to be transformed.”

Chaney is married to Rev. Michelle Holmes Chaney, and they have one daughter, Courtney Elizabeth.  Pastor Chaney holds degrees in communication from the University of Cincinnati and Georgia State University. He obtained a Master of Divinity degree from Candler School of Theology, Emory University, in Georgia.

The Baltimore-Washington Conference of The United Methodist Church is comprised of 694 congregations with nearly 200,000 members. It is the home of Methodism in America, with the founding of the denomination at Lovely Lane Chapel in 1784.
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The Organic Conversations
The Organic Movement is a kissing cousin to the Incarnational movement and a distant cousin to the Emergent movement. Like the other two it doesn’t see as much of a need for the institutional church has had traditional Christianity. But unlike the Emergent movement it is more literal in its interpretation of Scripture and truth. Neil Cole has long been one of the leading voices for the organic church. In his view the house church is the primary form of church. I have no problem with this view because Cole doesn’t dismiss the institutional church. In fact, one of my partners, Bill Tenny-Brittian, has extensive roots in the house church movement. I see it as a kissing cousin to small groups that multiply.  However, a new voice on the scene is Frank Viola and his book (with Barna), Pagan Christianity. This book stands in direct opposition to the Emergent folks because it takes a more literal approach to the Scripture. His book documents the problems with the institutional church that functions more like a business than the living organism it was created to be. Pagan Christianity is not only a logical sequence to Barna’s recent book, Revolution, it also is an interesting and accurate account of the historic events that have shaped today’s counterfeit form of Christianity.  

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THE CONVERSATION

 

THis is an excellent article by Bill Easum.  His observations and challenges are valid to the Organic Movement.    I am evaluating the emerging movement, organic movement and house church movement.  I would like to share some conversation about the three especially for those involved in urban ministry.

Is There Room At The Table is an article that articulates my frustrations and I want to develop a framework to discuss the hopes of an urban ministry paradigm that extends beyond the tokenism to the multicultural, gobal neighborhoods where we do ministry.